Kafka

Monday June 24, 2019

What's New in Apache Kafka 2.3

It’s official: Apache Kafka® 2.3 has been released! Here is a selection of some of the most interesting and important features we added in the new release.

Core Kafka

KIP-351 and KIP-427: Improved monitoring for partitions which have lost replicas
In order to keep your data safe, Kafka creates several replicas of it on different brokers. Kafka will not allow writes to proceed unless the partition has a minimum number of in-sync replicas. This is called the “minimum ISR.”

Kafka already had metrics showing the partitions that had fewer than the minimum number of in-sync replicas. In this release, KIP-427 adds additional metrics showing partitions that have exactly the minimum number of in-sync replicas. By monitoring these metrics, users can see partitions that are on the verge of becoming under-replicated.

Additionally, KIP-351 adds the --under-min-isr command line flag to the kafka-topics command. This allows users to easily see which topics have fewer than the minimum number of in-sync replicas.

KIP-354: Add a Maximum Log Compaction Lag
To a first-order approximation, previous values of a key in a compacted topic get compacted some time after the latest key is written. Only the most recent value is available, and previous values are not. However, it has always been possible to set the minimum amount of time a key would stick around before being compacted, so we don’t lose the old value too quickly. Now, with KIP-354, it’s possible to set the maximum amount of time an old value will stick around. The new parameter max.log.compaction.time.ms specifies how long an old value may possibly live in a compacted topic. This can be used in complying with data retention regulations such as the GDPR.

KIP-402: Improve fairness in SocketServer processors
Previously, Kafka would prioritize opening new TCP connections over handling existing connections. This could cause problems if clients attempted to create many new connections within a short time period.KIP-402 prioritizes existing connections over new ones, which improves the broker’s resilience to connection storms. The KIP also adds a max.connections per broker setting.

KIP-461: Improve failure handling in the Replica Fetcher
In order to keep replicas up to date, each broker maintains a pool of replica fetcher threads. Each thread in the pool is responsible for fetching replicas for some number of follower partitions. Previously, if one of those partitions failed, the whole thread would fail with it, causing under-replication on potentially hundreds of partitions. With this KIP, if a single partition managed by a given replica fetcher thread fails, the thread continues handling the remainder of its partitions.

KAFKA-7283: Reduce the amount of time the broker spends scanning log files when starting up
When the broker starts up after an unclean shutdown, it checks the logs to make sure they have not been corrupted. This JIRA optimizes that process so that Kafka only checks log segments that haven't been explicitly flushed to disk. Now, the time required for log recovery is no longer proportional to the number of logs. Instead, it is proportional to the number of unflushed log segments. Some of the benchmarks which Zhanxiang Huang discusses on the JIRA show up to a 50% reduction in broker startup time.

Kafka Connect

KIP-415: Incremental Cooperative Rebalancing in Kafka Connect
In Kafka Connect, worker tasks are distributed among the available worker nodes. When a connector is reconfigured or a new connector is deployed-- as well as when a worker is added or removed-- the tasks must be rebalanced across the Connect cluster. This helps ensure that all of the worker nodes are doing a fair share of the Connect work. In 2.2 and earlier, a Connect rebalance caused all worker threads to pause while the rebalance proceeded. As of KIP-415, rebalancing is no longer a stop-the-world affair, making configuration changes a more pleasant thing.

KIP-449: Add connector contexts to Connect worker logs
A running Connect cluster contains several different thread pools. Each of these threads emits its own logging, as one might expect. However, this makes it difficult to untangle the sequence of events involved in a single logical operation, since the parts of that operation are running asynchronously in their various threads across the cluster. This KIP adds some context to each Connect log message, making it much easier to make sense of the state of a single connector over time.

Take a look at Robin Moffatt’s blog post.

KIP-258: Allow Users to Store Record Times=tamps in RocksDB
Prior to this KIP, message timestamps were not stored in the Streams state store. Only the key and value were there. With t=his KIP, timestamps are now included in the state store. This KIP lays the groundwork to enable future features like handling out-of-order messages in KTables and implementing TTLs for KTables.

KIP-428: Add in-memory window store / KIP-445: Add in-memory Session Store
These KIPs add in-memory implementations for the Kafka Streams window store and session store. Previously, the only component with an in-memory implementation was the state store. The in-memory implementations provide higher performance, in exchange for lack of persistence to disk. In many cases, this can be a very good tradeoff.

KIP-313: Add KStream.flatTransform and KStream.flatTransformValues
The first half of this KIP, the flatTransform() method, was delivered in Kafka 2.2. The flatTransform() method is very similar to flatMap(), in that it takes a single input record and produces one or more output records. flatMap() does this in a type-safe way but without access to the ProcessorContext and the state store. We’ve been able to use the Processor API to perform this same kind of operation with access to the ProcessorContext and the state store, but without the type safety of flatMap(). flatTransform() gave us the best of both worlds: processor API access, plus compile-time type checking.

flatTransformValues(), just introduced in the completed KIP-313 in Kafka 2.3, is to flatTransform() as flatMapValues() is to flatMap(). It lets us do processor-API-aware computations that return multiple records for each input record without changing the message key and causing a repartition.

Conclusion

Thanks for reading! Check out the release notes for more details about all the great stuff in Kafka 2.3. Also, check out this YouTube video on the highlights of the release!

Wednesday November 07, 2018

Apache Kafka Supports 200K Partitions Per Cluster

In Kafka, a topic can have multiple partitions to which records are distributed. Partitions are the unit of parallelism. In general, more partitions leads to higher throughput. However, there are some factors that one should consider when having more partitions in a Kafka cluster. I am happy to report that the recent Apache Kafka 1.1.0 release has significantly increased the number of partitions that a single Kafka cluster can support from the deployment and the availability perspective.

To understand the improvement, it’s useful to first revisit some of the basics about partition leaders and the controller. First, each partition can have multiple replicas for higher availability and durability. One of the replicas is designated as the leader and all the client requests are served from this lead replica. Second, one of the brokers in the cluster acts as the controller that manages the whole cluster. If a broker fails, the controller is responsible for selecting new leaders for partitions on the failed broker.

The Kafka broker does a controlled shutdown by default to minimize service disruption to clients. A controlled shutdown has the following steps. (1) A SIG_TERM signal is sent to the broker to be shut down. (2) The broker sends a request to the controller to indicate that it’s about to shut down. (3) The controller then changes the partition leaders on this broker to other brokers and persists that information in ZooKeeper. (4) The controller sends the new leader to other brokers. (5) The controller sends a successful reply to the shutting down broker, which finally terminates its process. At this point, there is no impact to the clients since their traffic has already been moved to other brokers. This process is depicted in Figure 1 below. Note that step (4) and (5) can happen in parallel.


Figure 1. (1) shutdown initiated on broker 1; (2) broker 1 sends controlled shutdown request to controller on broker 0; (3) controller writes new leaders in ZooKeeper; (4) controller sends new leaders to broker 2; (5) controller sends successful reply to broker 1.

Before Kafka 1.1.0, during the controlled shutdown, the controller moves the leaders one partition at a time. For each partition, the controller selects a new leader, writes it to ZooKeeper synchronously and communicates the new leader to other brokers through a remote request. This process has a couple of inefficiencies. First, the synchronous writes to ZooKeeper have higher latency, which slows down the controlled shutdown process. Second, communicating the new leader one partition at a time adds many small remote requests to every broker, which can cause the processing of the new leaders to be delayed.

In Kafka 1.1.0, we made significant improvements in the controller to speed up the controlled shutdown. The first improvement is using the asynchronous API when writing to ZooKeeper. Instead of writing the leader for one partition, waiting for it to complete and then writing another one, the controller submits the leader for multiple partitions to ZooKeeper asynchronously and then waits for them to complete at the end. This allows for request pipelining between the Kafka broker and the ZooKeeper server and reduces the overall latency. The second improvement is that the communication of the new leaders is batched. Instead of one remote request per partition, the controller sends a single remote request with the leader from all affected partitions.

We also made significant improvement in the controller failover time. If the controller goes down, the Kafka cluster automatically elects another broker as the new controller. Before being able to elect the partition leaders, the newly-elected controller has to first reload the state of all partitions in the cluster from ZooKeeper. If the controller has a hard failure, the window in which a partition is unavailable can be as long as the ZooKeeper session expiration time plus the controller state reloading time. So reducing the state reloading time improves the availability in this rare event. Prior to Kafka 1.1.0, the reloading uses the synchronous ZooKeeper API. In Kafka 1.1.0, this is changed to also use the asynchronous API for better latency.

We executed tests to evaluate the performance improvement of the controlled shutdown time and the controller reloading time. For both tests, we set up a 5 node ZooKeeper ensemble on different server racks.

In the first test, we set up a Kafka cluster with 5 brokers on different racks. In that cluster, we created 25,000 topics, each with a single partition and 2 replicas, for a total of 50,000 partitions. So, each broker has 10,000 partitions. We then measured the time to do a controlled shutdown of a broker. The results are shown in the table below.

kafka 1.0.0 kafka 1.1.0
controlled shutdown time 6.5 minutes 3 seconds

A big part of the improvement comes from fixing a logging overhead, which unnecessarily logs all partitions in the cluster every time the leader of a single partition changes. By just fixing the logging overhead, the controlled shutdown time was reduced from 6.5 minutes to 30 seconds. The asynchronous ZooKeeper API change reduced this time further to 3 seconds. These improvements significantly reduce the time to restart a Kafka cluster.

In the second test, we set up another Kafka cluster with 5 brokers and created 2,000 topics, each with 50 partitions and 1 replica. This makes a total of 100,000 partitions in the whole cluster. We then measured the state reloading time of the controller and observed a 100% improvement (the reloading time dropped from 28 seconds in Kafka 1.0.0 to 14 seconds in Kafka 1.1.0).

With those improvements, how many partitions can one expect to support in Kafka? The exact number depends on factors such as the tolerable unavailability window, ZooKeeper latency, broker storage type, etc. As a rule of thumb, we recommend each broker to have up to 4,000 partitions and each cluster to have up to 200,000 partitions. The main reason for the latter cluster-wide limit is to accommodate for the rare event of a hard failure of the controller as we explained earlier. Note that other considerations related to partitions still apply and one may need some additional configuration tuning with more partitions.

The improvement that we made in 1.1.0 is just one step towards our ultimate goal of making Kafka infinitely scalable. We have also made improvements on latency with more partitions in 1.1.0 and will discuss that in a separate blog. In the near future, we plan to make further improvements to support millions of partitions in a Kafka cluster.

The controller improvement work in Kafka 1.1.0 is a true community effort. Over a period of 9 months, people from 6 different organizations helped out and made this happen. Onur Karaman led the original design, did the core implementation and conducted the performance evaluation. Manikumar Reddy, Prasanna Gautam, Ismael Juma, Mickael Maison, Sandor Murakozi, Rajini Sivaram and Ted Yu each contributed some additional implementation or bug fixes. More details can be found in KAFKA-5642 and KAFKA-5027. A big thank you to all the contributors!

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